3.9.6 Anthropogenic impact: Shipping activity

Photo: Bjørn Frantzen, Norwegian Polar Institute

Fisheries and other harvesting 2018
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The extent of the shipping activity is not obtained numerically. However, maps showing the AIS tracking of vessel in the Barents Sea in August, 2012 to 2018, confirms the increased fisheries effort east of Svalbard and also an increase in passenger vessels to the Svalbard area (Figure 3.9.6.1).

Fisheries and passenger vessels dominates in the traffic in the western and northwestern Barents Sea. A notable increase in the traffic in the northeastern Barents Sea, between Europe and Asia, by tankers and cargo vessels are also shown. The effect on the marine ecosystem of the increased tourist traffic is not known, but the possibility for more littering in a potential risk (Source: Havbase.no; the Norwegian Coastal Authorities).

Figure 3.9.6.1. Maps showing all vessels in the Barents Sea during August, 2012 to 2018. Yellow (passenger ships) and green (fishing vessels) dominates at open sea while red (ro-ro), orange (bulk), purple (goods) and blue (gas) cross between Europe and Asia (Source: Havbase.no; the Norwegian Coastal Authorities, AIS tracking.Figure 3.9.6.1. Maps showing all vessels in the Barents Sea during August, 2012 to 2018. Yellow (passenger ships) and green (fishing vessels) dominates at open sea while red (ro-ro), orange (bulk), purple (goods) and blue (gas) cross between Europe and Asia (Source: Havbase.no; the Norwegian Coastal Authorities, AIS tracking.

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