Haddock (Melanogrammus aeglefinus)

Fisheries and other harvesting
Typography
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Based on the most recent estimates of SSB (Figure 4.3.40), ICES classifies the stock as having full reproductive capacity, but also in danger of being harvested unsustainably. Fishing mortality has fluctuated around FMSY (0.35) during the last 10 years, but has increased considerably since 2010 and is now above Fpa. Very strong year classes (2004-2006) recruited to the fishable stock in 2008-2010; thus, the stock in 2010-2011 reached the highest level observed in the time series that goes back to

1950. The 2007 and later year classes are estimated to be of average size, and the stock is now decreasing. The 2014 TAC was set at 178,500 tonnes; according to the harvest control rule, it should have been set at 150,000 tonnes (a 25% reduction from 2013) (ICES AFWG, 2014).

Figure 4.3.40. Northeast Arctic haddock, development of spawning stock biomass (green bars), immature stock biomass (age 3 and older, red bars) and landings (black curve).Figure 4.3.40. Northeast Arctic haddock, development of spawning stock biomass (green bars), immature stock biomass (age 3 and older, red bars) and landings (black curve).

During summer and autumn, the Barents Sea haddock stock is widely distributed in shallow waters to the north along the Svalbard/Spitsbergen Archipelago and to the east along the Murman Coast (Figure 4.3.41).  At this same time, a significant part of the stock is located in the central part of the Sea (ICES AFWG, 2014).