Currents and transports

Photo: Norwegian Polar Institute

Meteorological and oceanographical conditions 2019
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The volume flux into the Barents Sea varies with periods of several years. The annual volume flux was relatively high during 2003–2006 (Fig. 3.1.4). From 2006 to 2014, the inflow was relatively stable before it increased substantially in 2015 to about 1 Sv above the long-term average. The year of 2016 had relatively low inflow. Since 2017 the annual volume inflow to the Barents Sea has decreased, but the data series presently stops in May 2019 thus the annual value of 2019 should presently be considered a rough estimate. There is no statistically significant trend in the annual volume fluxes.

Volume fluxes split into quarterly periods show that volume flux has decreased in winter (January–March) and spring (April–June) during the last 5 years (since 2015), while it has increased in summer (July–September) and fall (October–December) (Fig. 3.1.4). The inflow in spring 2019 was about 1 Sv lower than in 2018, but these number might change when the time series (which presently stop in May 2019) is updated.

Figure 3.1.4. Observation-based annual volume flux anomalies (in Sverdrups) through the Fugløya–Bear Island Section. Upper panel show annual mean volume flux, while the four lower panels show quarterly volume flux. The volume flux is calculated for the area 71°15 to 73°45’N, and include all waters flowing inside this area. Figure 3.1.4. Observation-based annual volume flux anomalies (in Sverdrups) through the Fugløya–Bear Island Section. Upper panel show annual mean volume flux, while the four lower panels show quarterly volume flux. The volume flux is calculated for the area 71°15 to 73°45’N, and include all waters flowing inside this area.

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